WELCOME STUDENTS!



This is a blog created for my students and of course for all my fellow teachers of English who may find it useful.


Sunday, 17 December 2017

Picture Prompt Writing - Grade A

You are writing an e-mail to your keypal and you are attaching a photo of you . explain to him / her what the photo shows. Try to use the present continuous tense!

CLASS A1







CLASS A3














Sunday, 26 November 2017

THINK TEEN 3rd GRADE Beginners UNIT 6 TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS

UNIT 6 KEEPING TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS ALIVE

The second tradition the book presents in this chapter is Valentine's Day. At the British Council's site there is an excellent resource for teaching and learning about Valentine's Day traditions and customs:
http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/uk-now/read-uk/valentines-day

THINK TEEN 3rd GRADE Beginners UNIT 6 TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS

UNIT 1 KEEPING TRADITIONS AND CUSTOMS ALIVE

One of the first two traditions the book presents is Halloween. The British Council at its site LearnEnglishTeens offers the following Lesson on Halloween traditions and customs. You can use it as a supplement of the unit or as a lesson on its own.




Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Poetry in the EFL classroom

The 21st March was declared by UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) World Poetry Day, in 1999. The purpose of the day is to promote the reading, writing, publishing and teaching of poetry throughout the world and to "give fresh recognition and impetus to national, regional and international poetry movements".
Having in mind the above date, the students of the 2nd Grade of Iraklia's Junior High School studied Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare and decided to make a visualization of the poem's lines and stanzas. This is what they have produced:


B1 Students:




B2 Students:


     SONNET 130
by William Shakespeare
     My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
     Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;

     If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
     If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.

     I have seen roses damasked, red and white,

     But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
     And in some perfumes is there more delight
     Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

     I love to hear her speak, yet well I know

     That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
     I grant I never saw a goddess go;
     My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.


     And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare

     As any she belied with false compare.